A/V Video Project: Editing for Rough Cuts

This week, the A/V squad took our raw footage and transformed them into rough cuts of our final video. This was my first experience with Adobe products including Premiere and Photoshop.

We are recording voice-over material and the final video is on the way; check in next week for it.

A combination of edited video, screen overlays, and voiceover audio to make a finished rough cut

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A/V Video Project: Capturing Video with a DSLR

Utilizing our storyboarding from last week, our A/V team collected the raw footage we will use to make our informational video on how to make an Acrylic box.

This was a two-pronged learning experience, doing fabrication for the first time and also using this fancy camera.

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Dice Catapult 5000

Do you ever get tired of throwing your own dice during a particularly long game of Monopoly?

Me neither because no one plays monopoly anymore, but for your dice throwing pleasure, here is the Dice Catapult 5000!

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A/V Video Project: Storyboarding

Meet my partners in crime: Jim & Yeon Hee; we will be working together on a video project for the next few weeks.

Our goal is to create a video on how to make an Acrylic Box – one of these:

We performed the storyboarding process this week and this and agreed upon the structure. The current storyboarding is as follows:

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Push to cross: power and access [Part 1 of 2]

You likely have seen the push-to-cross buttons scattered across various crosswalks in NYC.

The functionality and effectiveness of these buttons is often challenged, and with good reason. The primary reason is because most of them are not even connected to the system that governs the traffic lights! As originally reported by the New York Times in 2004:

 “…the city deactivated most of the pedestrian buttons long ago with the emergence of computer-controlled traffic signals. More than 2,500 of the 3,250 walk buttons that were in place at the time existed as mechanical placebos.”

Continue reading Push to cross: power and access [Part 1 of 2]

Push to cross: power and access [Part 2 of 2]

continued from part 1 here

While thousands of NYC push-to-cross buttons are inactive, there are ~150 special new push-to-cross buttons. They are called Accessible Pedestrian Signals (APDs), and they look like this:

Unlike the crosswalk buttons of old, the primary purpose of APD’s are to help blind and low-vision pedestrians navigate crosswalks more safely. They also provide a legend to the 3 modes of the crosswalk light (from a visual management perspective, this seems unnecessary if not counter productive).

From the NYC Department of Transportation (DOT), APDs are:

“wired to a pedestrian signal and send audible and vibrotactile indications when pedestrians push a button installed at the crosswalk.”

In other words, they vibrate upon touch, and also make the following audible noises:

  1. A command to “Wait” every time the button is pressed when the cross light is red:

Continue reading Push to cross: power and access [Part 2 of 2]